I'm Not a HumaN BeinG

I’d run my whole life long to reach you; paddle my way across Atlantic and Pacific; traverse Jungle and Desert to find you; climb cliffs and drop from the sky to rescue you. Anything to be close to you. Any way to say I love you.

O human, search your own heart everyday. Do not wander in confusion. This world is a passing magic-show; no one will hold your hand. Sri Guru Granth Sahib ji
Ang 727

(Source: mcmlxxx-viii)

This picture sums up my life right now.I tend to destroy everything that’s dear and beautiful to me with my bare hands.

This picture sums up my life right now.I tend to destroy everything that’s dear and beautiful to me with my bare hands.

(Source: kristina-neumann, via biba-putt)

Happy Baisakhi from Calistan

Happy Baisakhi from Calistan

"People need dramatic examples to shake them out of apathy, and I can’t do that as Bruce Wayne. As a man, I’m flesh and blood; I can be ignored, I can be destroyed. But as a symbol… as a symbol I can be incorruptible. I can be everlasting" - Bruce Wayne in Batman Begins

"People need dramatic examples to shake them out of apathy, and I can’t do that as Bruce Wayne. As a man, I’m flesh and blood; I can be ignored, I can be destroyed. But as a symbol… as a symbol I can be incorruptible. I can be everlasting" - Bruce Wayne in Batman Begins

(Source: erickun, via riskinder)

Saber with Scabbard

  • Dated: 19th century
  • Culture: Turkish
  • Medium: steel, gold, gilt brass, diamonds, emeralds, pearls
  • Measurements: overall length 39 3/4 inches (100.97 cm)
  • Provenance: Sultan Murad V

The most important ceremony in the inauguration of many Islamic rulers was the investiture with a sword, rather than a crown. This extravagantly decorated saber traditionally is said to have been refitted in 1876 for the investiture of the Ottoman sultan Murad V (reigned May 30–August 31, 1876).

He suffered a nervous breakdown before the ceremony and subsequently was deposed and kept a prisoner until his death in 1904. The sword was probably assembled by a court jeweler, using a seventeenth-century Iranian blade, an eighteenth-century Indian jade grip, and gem-studded gold and gilt-brass mounts of contemporary workmanship.

The emerald near the top of the scabbard opens to reveal a secret compartment containing a gold coin marked with the name of Süleyman the Magnificent (1494–1566), the most powerful Ottoman ruler of the sixteenth century. The underside of the emerald is inscribed with the phrase “According to God’s will.”

Source: Copyright 2014 © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

(Source: art-of-swords, via amanpreetk)

In this age of the quantified self, we measure how many hours we slept, steps we took, calories we burned. Yet we know nothing about ourselves. We spend more time checking-in to our stats than our souls. Our experience is mined for data but not depth. We have all these numbers to improve now, but no idea how to dial back the numbness. Life doesn’t have to be a spreadsheet, yet our useless fascination goes on. We spend more time shopping, in considering the thread-count of our sheets before purchase, than we do soul-searching, that beautiful art of thinking about the quality and purpose of our lives.
We are addicted to the constant digital stream, often peering gape-mouthed into the sordid details of other people’s lives; in the process we have checked-out of reality, neglecting our own life so pregnant with potential and meaning.
If we are to measure and monitor and improve anything, let it be our presence and character, a mindfulness for who we are and how we are experiencing and relating with the world. Have I been true to myself? Have I lived vibrantly today? Have I loved openly today? Have I made a difference today? Let us check in to ourselves in these ways; for, in the end, these are the only measures that matter.
Brendon Burchard, for the Huffington Post Quantified Self, Lost Soul.

(Source: theriverjordyn, via knotformation)

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